Ron Johnson: John Boehner Would Lose Speakership If He Caves On Taxes To Avert Sequester

Ron Johnson: John Boehner Would Lose Speakership If He Caves On Taxes To Avert Sequester.

What is all this business about caving to taxes? Again whether you are republican or democrats especially elected official, shouldn’t the priority be to get the country back on its feet and out of the fire? The repercussion are enormous if nothing is done about the sequester as the United States will be worse off with more job loss and automatic spending cuts that will affect many of the government assistance programs people use on a daily basis. Senator Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) told Fox News that House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) would lose his speakership if he agrees to new tax revenues to advert the across the board spending cuts that are set to kit in March 1. The comment has raised questions a second time about Boehner’s ability to be House Speaker in the last few months including claims during the fiscal cliff talks in December where he was accused of being more concerned about his job as speaker than making a deal. He most likely will not lose his position even with tensions in the Republican party he was still re-elected to the House Speaker position with only ten House Republicans voting against him. In the fight over sequester, Boehner in his statements has confirmed he will not accept any new tax revenues or hikes, while the president and Democrats are asking for a solution that involves spending cuts and increased revenue by closing corporate tax loopholes and implementing the Buffet rule to raise taxes on billionaires. Hey if Warren Buffet himself is asking for increase in taxes why not do it? In his own statement make Monday, Boehner remarked,”The president says we have to have another tax increase in order to avoid the sequester…Well, Mr. President, you got your tax increase. It’s time to cut spending here in Washington.”

Gun Control Bill With Bipartisan Support Unveiled In House

Gun Control Bill With Bipartisan Support Unveiled In House.

All I have to say it is about time for both parties to work together even though I am sure not all members agree. On Tuesday, lawmakers revealed their first bipartisan bill to make firearms trafficking a federal crime. During a press conference the bill’s sponsors- Reps. Patrick Meehan (R-Pa.), Carolyn Maloney (D-N.Y.), Scott Rigell (R-Va.) and Elijah Cummings (D-Md.)- said that the measure would create one federal code giving law enforcement the ability to prosecute gun traffickers and impose up to 20 years in jail for those who buy guns for people who cannot buy them on their own.This recommendations is among the gun violence package give to the President last month. Scott Rigell, a sponsor of the bill, said “As a lifetime member of the NRA, as a firearm owner, as a father … I’ve got a problem with people who break the law using firearms because it inevitably puts pressure on my rights…When we punish the bad guys, we’re protecting the good guys. That’s really the essence of the bill.” Another bill sponsor, Patrick Meehan, said he’s “glad to be able to reach across the aisle and work toward common sense solutions” like their gun trafficking bill, which he noted has a companion bill in the Senate. For some like Cummings the issue is personal since losing his nephew to gun violence a year and a half ago. The man obstacle to this bipartisan partnership is whether the bill will make it to a vote. There is support from both sides but it all depends on whether or not House Republican leaders will allow it through. The Senate, however, will be the first to vote on the bill and will have to pass. Hill aids and gun policy advocates expect something to pass in the senate but are unsure about whether this will happen or not. The goal is to get as many single measures passed toward a solution to the gun violence issue, but combining them with other measures may hurt their chance of being passed according to the bill sponsors. The NRA has not officially taken a position on the new bill yet but hopes to work with Congress as it passed through the legislative process.