Ebola Patient Zero Found, Ceasefire in Gaza, Islamic State Massacre of Yazidis and Ukraine Demand Rebels to Surrender

https://i0.wp.com/bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/journalstar.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/4/54/4543074b-30bb-5158-bbbe-9634977bb3b2/53e14fbe8cde0.preview-300.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/media.cagle.com/164/2014/08/05/151879_600.jpghttps://pbs.twimg.com/media/BuixhgDIgAEY6WG.jpg:largehttps://farm3.staticflickr.com/2930/13946334770_86be81b552_o.jpg

According to the AOL article, Ebola outbreak: ‘patient zero’ could be young boy, the latest and deadliest outbreak of Ebola in history might have started with a 2 year old boy, according to researchers who traced the virus to a village in Guinea located by the borders of Sierra Leone and Liberia. The boy died December 6th four days after vomiting, black stools and fever followed by his mother, sister, and grandmother in January and then a midwifed passed from the same sickness in February causing the person who took care of her to get sick. The illness was identified in March as Ebola,however, it had spread to Sierra Leone and Liberia. Nigeria, Liberia and Sierra Leone all declared states of emergencies and West Africa has received nearly $16 million to help battle the deadly outbreak that has killed 1,000 killed. Sharon Begley and Toni Clarke of Reuters reports that three U.S. facilities are on standby in the event of a major public health threat to quickly make vaccines and therapeutics to treat Ebola if the U.S. government decided to scale up. The facilities, called Centers for Innovation in Advanced Development and Manufacturing (ADM), were set up by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in partnership with private industry, to respond to pandemics or chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear threats. Brett Giroir, chief executive of Texas A&M Health Science Center, site of one of the facilities, said: “They know our number and they can call us 24 hours a day. We are prepared.” Global health agencies are considering whether to make experimental drugs, which have only been tested on monkeys, available to patients in West Africa where the deadly Ebola outbreak has claimed so many. The World Health Organization is bringing together a group of bioethicists to consider the issue as who gets the treatments or vaccine. U.S. officials have emphasized quarantine measures to help prevent the spread. The decision to order any of the three advanced labs to start production of Ebola treatments must come from the highest level of the Obama administration. According to Rodrique Ngowi, Ebola Outbreak Flagged By Online Tool Before Formal WHO Announcement, an online tool run by experts in Boston flagged a “mystery hemorrhagic fever” in the forested area of southeastern Guinea nine days before the World Health Organization announced the epidemic. Ngowi reports, “HealthMap uses algorithms to scour tens of thousands of social media sites, local news, government websites, infectious-disease physicians’ social networks and other sources to detect and track disease outbreaks. Sophisticated software filters irrelevant data, classifies the relevant information, identifies diseases and maps their locations with the help of experts.” The co-founder John Brownstein said: “It shows some of these informal sources are helping paint a picture of what’s happening that’s useful to these public health agencies.” HealthMap is operated by a group of 45 researchers, epidemiologists and software developers at Boston Children’s Hospital. HealthMap generates information that included location of specific outbreaks and tracks new cases and deaths.

To the east, the Israeli military says no rockets were fired on Monday at Israel and the military hasn’t targeted any locations in densely populated territories since the ceasefire between Hamas and Israel when into effect midnight Sunday as the two sides resume talks in Cairo, the Associated Press reported, Cease-fire holding in Gaza between Israel and Hamas. In total, 1,900 Palestinians were killed and 67 on the Israeli side in the almost two month long war. Palestinians negotiators are asking for an end to the Gaza blockade imposed by Israel and Egypt, while Israel wants all Gaza militants to disarm. Egypt brokered a similar truce last week, but after three days, militants resumed rocket fire on Israel and new fighting erupted. Egypt called on Israel and Palestinian factions to observe a 72 hour ceasefire beginning within hours and resume talks on more comprehensive Gaza agreement. Egypt’s Foreign Ministry announcement followed after hours of talks with Palestinian factions in Cairo who accepted the proposal and the deal would not have been made if the ceasefire agreement was not secure indicating Israel had accepted. Sunday’s decision was aimed at bringing Israeli back to the table, according to a Palestinian negotiator: “We are here to look for an agreement. We cannot have an agreement without talks, so we accepted an Egyptian proposal to have a cease-fire for 72 hours in order to resume the talks.” A senior Palestinian negotiator noted that Palestinian would make more modest demand if talks resume and seek an end to the bloodshed in Gaza, internationally backed efforts to rebuild and an easing of the blockade. One negotiator commented: “We might not get everything we want, particularly on freedom of movement. But we believe the Israelis and the world have gotten the point that Gazans should live normally and things should be much better than today.” Israeli Justice Minister Tzipi Livni said Hams could get the blockade lifted if they meet international demands to renounce violence and recognize Israel’s right to exist: “Basically what they are trying now to do is not to lift the blockade. They want to get legitimacy as a terrorist organization, without accepting the requirements of the international community.”

In Neighboring Iraq, the Obama administration has decided to directly provide weapons to Kurdish forces to fight the Islamic militants in northern Iraq, according to a senior U.S. officials, the Associated Press reports, US sending arms to Kurds in Iraq. Previously, the U.S. would only sell arms to the Iraqi government in Baghdad, but the Kurdish fighters were losing ground in recent weeks to the Islamic State militants. In recent days, the U.S. military has facilitated weapons deliveries from the Iraqis to the Kurds providing logistic assistant and transportation to the north. The assistance allowed the Kurdish forces on Sunday to take back two towns from the Islamic insurgents aided in part by U.S. airstrikes int he region. President Barack Obama authorized the airstrikes to protect U.S. interests and personnel in the region, including at facilities in Ibril as well as Yazidi refugees fleeing militants. Speaking in Australia on Monday, Secretary of State John Kerry said no force should be used by political factions as Iraq struggles to form a government and the country’s new president is acting appropriately despite the accusations of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. Maliki is resisting calls to step down and will file a complaint against the president for not naming him prime minister. Kerry said: “We believe that the government formation process is critical in terms of sustaining the stability and calm in Iraq. And our hope is that Mr. Maliki will not stir those waters.” While some progress has been made in the north, Reuters reports, Islamic State Killed 500 Yazidis, Buried Some Victims Alive: “Islamic State militants have killed at least 500 members of Iraq’s Yazidi minority, burying some alive and taking hundreds of women as slaves, an Iraqi government minister told Reuters on Sunday.” Human rights minister Mohammed Shia al-Sudani accused the militant group of celebrating “a vicious atrocity” with cheers and weapons waved in the air. Sudani via phone interview said: “We have striking evidence obtained from Yazidis fleeing Sinjar and some who escaped death, and also crime scene images that show indisputably that the gangs of the Islamic State have executed at least 500 Yazidis after seizing Sinjar. Some of the victims, including women and children were buried alive in scattered mass graves in and around Sinjar.” During a visit by French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, Kurdish regional president Masoud Barzani said: “We are not fighting a terrorist organization, we are fighting a terrorist state.” Barzani has asked his allied to send weapons to help fight the insurgency. In comments likely to put pressure on Washington to step up its response, Iraqi rights minster Sudani said: “The terrorist Islamic State has also taken at least 300 Yazidi women as slaves and locked some of them inside a police station in Sinjar and transferred others to the town of Tal Afar. We are afraid they will take them outside the country. In some of the images we have obtained there are lines of dead Yazidis who have been shot in the head while the Islamic State fighters cheer and wave their weapons over the corpses. This is a vicious atrocity.” At the Vatican, Pope Francis held a silent prayers during his weekly address on Sunday for the victims of the Iraqi conflict including the Christan minority saying: “Thousands of people, among them many Christians, banished brutally from their houses, children dying of hunger and thirst as they flee, women kidnapped, people massacred, violence of all kinds. All of this deeply offends God and deeply offends humanity.” Both France and the U.S. criticize Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s Shi’ite led government for failing to share power with Iraq’s Sunni minority who dominated before the U.S. led invasion. Foreign Minister Fabius said: “Iraq is in need of a broad unity government, and all Iraqis should feel that they are represented in this government. All Iraqis should feel they are represented to take part in this battle against terrorism.”

Leaving the Middle East for another conflict to the north, on Sunday, fighting raged on in Donetsk as government forces closed in on the rebel stronghold Ukraine and pro-Russian insurgents backed away from an unconditional ceasefire offer announced the day before, Yuras Karmanau reports, Ukraine Demands Rebels In Donetsk Surrender. With western backing and a string of military success, Kiev has taken a hard line stance against rebel forces and won’t relent until the rebels surrender. In a statement Saturday, newly elected rebel leader Aleksandr Zakharchenko called an apparent ceasefire without stating any preconditions, however Sunday, rebel spokeswoman Elena Nikiting told the Associated Press that talks on the conflict could begin if the Ukrainian army withdrew from the region which Kiev won’t do. Ukraine’s National Security and Defense Council spokesman Andriy Lysenko said the only way the rebels in Donetsk will be saved will be to lay down their arms and give up and has not seen any real willingness to cooperate: “If white flags come up and they lay down their arms, nobody is going to shoot at them. (But) we have not seen any practical steps yet, just a statement.” Lysenko added that the Ukrainian military’s recent success has caused “panic and chaos in the ranks of the rebels” and Kiev has information that the rebels are “deserting their posts en masse.” More than 1,300 people have died in the conflict since April, according to U.N. estimates. On Sunday, German Foreign Minister Frank Walter Steinmer expressed concern over the humanitarian situation for civilians in Donetsk and Luhansk where conditions are getting worse. He said Germany is working with ICRC and U.N. agencies to ensure that existing aid is coordinated and gets delivered where it is needed. He said it was “good that there seems to be basic agreement about the delivery of humanitarian goods between Ukraine and Russia,” but said that Russian aid “must only be delivered with the express agreement of the Ukrainian government” and under the supervision of international organizations.

Palestinian Israeli Ceasefire , Russia and Ukraine Push Their Boundaries and the Islamic State Militia Continues to Expand Its Middle Eastern Territory

https://i0.wp.com/media.cagle.com/82/2014/07/18/151093_600.jpg

http://assets.nydailynews.com/polopoly_fs/1.1824863!/img/httpImage/image.jpg_gen/derivatives/article_970/bill-bramhall-editorial-cartoon-obama-game.jpg

Israel withdrew most of its troops from Gaza on Sunday which could be a sign that Israel is winding down its month long offensive against Hamas leaving 1,800 Palestinians and 60 Israelis dead. AOL reports, Israel withdraws most troops from Gaza, even though Israel is close to completing its mission, heavy fighting continued with 10 Palestinians being killed in an alleged Israeli airstrike near a U.N. school, according to U.N. and Palestinians officials. The U.S. and United Nations condemned the attack. It is uncertain whether Israel would unilaterally end the war since Hamas officials vowed to continue their fight. Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, an Israeli military spokesman, confirmed most of the ground troops have pulled out of Gaza after destroying a majority of the Hamas tunnel network. He said Israel detected 30 tunnels dug along the border for what he called a “synchronized attack” on Israel. However, Lerner said the operation was not over and Israel will continue to target Hamas’ rocket firing capabilities as well as its ability to infiltrate Israel. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu voes to continue his assault against Hamas, but has come under international pressure to halt the fighting due to a high civilian death toll. U.N. officials say more than three quarters of the dead are civilians including the 10 killed on Sunday at a U.N. school in Rafah. U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called the attack a “moral outrage and a criminal act” and demanded a quick investigation, while the U.S. State Department said Washington was “appalled” by the “disgraceful” attack. Israel Cabinet minister Amir Peretz told channel 10: “It’s not a withdrawal. It’s setting up a new line that is a more controlled line with the air force doing its work.” One senior officials, under conditions of anonymity because he was discussing internal Hamas deliberations, said: “If Israel stops unilaterally, Hamas will declare victory and will not grant any security or truce to Israel. In this case, we are going to live under a war of attrition until a political solution is found.”

Unfortunately, a seven hour truce went into effect Monday after Israel agreed it would unilaterally hold fire in Gaza, but Palestinians immediately accused Israel of breaking the ceasefire agreement by bombing a house in Gaza, Reuters reports, Palestinians accuse Israel of immediately breaking 7-hour ceasefire that began Monday at 3am EST. An Israel military spokeswoman said she was checking into it, while Gaza Health Ministry spokesman Ashraf Al-Qidra said 15 people were wounded in the strike on a house in Shati camp of mostly women and children. An Israeli defense officials said the ceasefire would apply to all areas except Rafah where ground forces have intensified assaults after three soldiers died in a Hamas ambush Friday. While a Hamas envoy in Egypt negotiates a truce that Israel has shunned in anger, Sami Abu Zuhri, the group’s spokesman said: “The calm Israel declared is unilateral and aims to divert attention away from the Israeli massacres. We do not trust such a calm and we urge our people to exercise caution.” Meanwhile, Israeli Brigadier General Motti Almoz told Army Radio: “Redeployment lets us work on the tunnels, provides defense (of Israeli communities nearby) and lets the forces set up for further activity. There is no ending here, perhaps an interim phase.” According to Ibrahim Barzak and Peter Enav, Cease-fire slows Gaza war as Israeli bus attacked, while Israel declared the temporary ceasefire and troops withdrawals slowed violence on Monday in Gaza, an Israeli bus was attacked killing one person in Jerusalem which symbolizes the tensions simmering in the region. For the moment though, violence seems to be waning as Hamas rocket fire tapers off and Israel’s ground operation in Gaza winds down. According to the article: “Israel’s Channel 10 TV showed cellphone video of what it said was the attack, with the yellow excavator slamming its large shovel into the bus. Police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said a police officer in the area opened fire and killed the attacker. A pedestrian also was killed, said Jerusalem district police chief Yossi Piranti.” Before the attacks, the seven hour Israeli ceasefire in Gaza was in effect , even though Israel continued to hit selected Palestinians target, the level of fighting was lower than previous days.

Fortunately, on Monday, as Josef Federman reports, Israel accepts Egyptian cease-fire plan, the Israeli government has finally accepted an Egyptian ceasefire deal to halt the month long war against Hamas militants in Gaza signaling the end of one of the bloodiest rounds of fighting, according to a senior Israeli official said. In addition, the official said a preliminary truce would begin at 8am Tuesday as the Israeli delegation would head to Egypt to work out a long term truce over the next three days. A delegation of Palestinian officials has negotiated with Egypt in recent days and representative have accept the proposal, while Hamas had no comment but has delegate presents at the time. Bassam Salhi, a member of the Palestinian delegation, said, “It’s clear now that the interest of all parties is to have a cease-fire. It’s going to be tough negotiations because Israel has demands too.” Under conditions of anonymity, the Israeli official said Israel will be watching the negotiation “with a certain amount of skepticism” given the previous failures.

Meanwhile, the Russian military is exercising their power as a show of their strength near the border with Ukraine, while Ukrainian troops cross over into Russia. Reuters reports, Russia Conducts Military Exercises With More Than 100 Aircraft Near Ukraine, Igor Kilmov quoted by Interfax news agency said it was the first session in a series to increase the unity of the air force this year as well as conduct missile practice with some of Russia’s newest frontline bombers and did not mention Ukraine where pro-Russian rebels are fighting the Ukrainian government. While, Laura Mills reports, Ukrainian soldiers cross border into Russia, a Russian border security official said 400 Ukrainian soldiers crossed into Russia, an Interfax news agency report said. There were conflicting reports on both sides of why the soldiers were there. The Russian official said the soldiers deserted the Kiev governments and the Russian side opened the corridor, however, a Ukrainian military official said the soldiers were forced into Russian territory by rebel fire after running out of ammunition. Vasily Malayev, head of the Federal Security Service’s border patrol in the Rostov region, told Interfax 438 soldiers on Monday were allowed to safely enter the country. A spokesman for the Ukrainian military operation in the east, Oleksiy Dmitrashkovsky, said the 72nd brigade army was pinned into their position due to a sustained barrage of fire from separatists forcing the brigade to split up into two sections. The battle in eastern Ukraine has been raging since April and claimed at least 1,129 civilians, according to a U.N. estimate. Though Russia denies any involvement, Ukraine and Western countries have accused Russia of providing the rebels with equipment and expertise.

On Sunday, Islamic State fighters claimed control of Iraq’s biggest dam, an oilfield and three more towns on Sunday inflicting their first major defeat on Kurdish forces since moving across norther Iraq in June, Ahmed Rasheed and Raheem Salman report, Islamic State Seizes Small Towns In Iraq’s North. Capturing the electricity generating Mosul Dam could allow Sunni militants to flood major Iraqi cities or withhold water in a bid to topple Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki’s Shi’ite-led government. In addition, the Islamic state has seized the Ain Zalah pil field, adding to the four others it controls providing funding for their operation, and three towns. The group poses the biggest threat to OPEC member Iraq since Saddam Hussein fell in 2003 as it has already declared a caliphate in parts of Iraq and Syria to rule over Muslims. On Sunday, the group also fought in a border town far away in Lebanon symbolizing its ambition to spread across the Middle East. So far, it controls cities in Iraq’s Tigris and Euphrates valley s north and west of Baghdad and a large portion of Syria stretching from the Iraqi border in the east to Aleppo in the northwest. In a statement, the Islamic State said, “Hundreds fled leaving vehicles and a huge number of weapons and munitions and the brothers control many areas. The fighters arrived in the border triangle between Iraq, Syria and Turkey.” The Islamic State has tried to consolidate its gains by setting its sights on strategic towns near oil fields as well as border crossing with Syria so it can move supplies back and forth. Maliki’s opponents say the prime minister, a Shi’ite Islamist who is trying to stat in power for a third term after an inconclusive parliamentary election in April, is to blame for the insurgency due to excluding Sunnis from power. Additionally, Kurdish leaders call for Maliki to step down to create a more inclusive government in Baghdad. After Sunday’s withdrawal of Kurdish troops, the Kurdish region is pressing Washington for sophisticated weapons to help their fighters to push back the Islamist militants, according to U.S. and Kurdish officials. The Islamic State’s ambitions have caused other Arab states to take notice and fear their success will embolden militants region wide. Meanwhile, in Lebanon on Monday, thousands of civilians and Syrian refugees fled in packed cars and pickup trucks from an eastern border town where militants from Syria have overrun, Bassem Mroue reports, Thousands flee as Lebanese battle Syrian militants. The fleeing comes as Lebanese troops struggle to rid Arsal of the Syrian extremists marking the most serious spillover of violence from Syria’s cavil war into Lebanon and increasing fears that Lebanon is becoming a new front for Syria;s conflict, now in its third year. In all, at least 11 Lebanese troops have been killed and 13 missing in the Arsal clashes that erupted Saturday after Syrian militants crossed the border and overran army positions in the area.

The Middle East Crisis Deepens as Militants Gain Ground

AP Photo/Jaber al-Helo

Last Friday, Pentagon officials announced that the U.S. had started to fly armed drones over Baghdad to protect U.S. civilians and military forces in the Iraqi capital, according to the Associate Press. The senior defense official under anonymity confirmed that a handful of Predators armed with Hellfire missiles are being used in the mission. The drones are assisting manned and unmanned aircraft in the collection of data as well as provide protection for U.S. interests since President Obama has not authorized airstrikes against Sunni militants who have overrun parts of the country. The Pentagon on Thursday said that four teams of Army special forces had arrived in Baghdad bringing the number of American troops there to 90 of the 300 Obama promised to send. The Americans will advise and assist in the Iraqi counterterrorism efforts.

On Saturday of last week, the Iraqi government took steps to retake the northern city of Tikrit back from Sunni militants using soldiers backed by tanks and helicopter gunships, reported Ryan Lucas and Qassim Abdul Zahra (Iraq Launches Push For Militant-Held Tikrit). Reports coming from the city were conflicting as residents said the militants were still in control of the city by nightfall, while Iraqi officials said the troops had reached the outskirts and even made it as far as the heart of Tikrit itself. What has become very clear was the government’s desire to portray their efforts as a significant step in the right direction after two weeks of defeats at the hands of the al-Qaida breakaway Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. The series of defeats across the northern and western regions of Iraq has lead to the deepest crisis since the U.S. exited in December of 2011 threatening the stability of the country as the militants threaten to cleave the  nation in three along sectarian and ethnic lines. If successful, according to Lucas and Abdul Zahra, the Tikrit operation could restore some faith in the security forces and save Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s job. Many residents of the city have fled in anticipation of a government assault turning Tikrit into a ghost town. The city has been without power or water since last Friday night, according to one resident, Muhanad Saif al-Din. Early Saturday, the military carried out three airstrikes on the insurgent held city of Mosul, the second largest city in Iraq and the initial target of the Islamic State’s offensive in the country. The Islamic State, which has seized control of large parts of northern and eastern Syria, aim to create a state straddling Syria and Iraq governed by Islamic law. Al-Maliki, the Prime Minister of Iraq, has failed to unite the Shiite and Sunni groups allowing militants to tap into the deep seated discontent among Iraq’s Sunni community fueling their anger. The Unites States and other world leaders have told al-Maliki to reach out to the country’s Sunni and Kurdish minorities and have called for more inclusive government to address longstanding grievances, according to Lucas and Abdul Zahra. Al-Maliki has refused to step aside and will seek a third consecutive term as prime minister as his bloc won the most seats in the April election.

On Sunday of last week, the al-Qaida breakaway group declared the establishment of a new Islamic state demanding allegiance from Muslims worldwide, according to the Associate Press article Al-Qaida splinter declares new Islamic caliphate. The spokesman for the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, made the announcement in an audio statement posted online on the first day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. Al-Adnanai declared the group’s chief, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, as the new leader, or caliph, calling for jihadi groups everywhere to swear allegiance to al-Baghdadi and support him. Al-Adnani states,”The legality of all emirates, groups, states and organizations becomes null by the expansion of the caliph’s authority and the arrival of its troops to their areas. Listen to your caliph and obey him. Support your state, which grows every day.” The Islamic state’s territory runs from northern Syria to the Iraqi province of Diyala, according to Al-Adnani. With the establishment of the caliphate, the group changed its name to the Islamic State. In email comments, Charles Lister, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center, explains that:”This announcement poses a huge threat to al-Qaida and its long-time position of leadership of the international jihadist cause. Taken globally, the younger generation of the jihadist community is becoming more and more supportive of (the Islamic State), largely out of fealty to its slick and proven capacity for attaining rapid results through brutality.” Al-Baghdadi has long been at odds with al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahri and the two have had a very public falling out after al-Baghdadi ignored al-Zawahri’s demands that the Islamic State leave Syria. In February, al Zawahri formally disavowed al-Baghdadi. The declarations comes as the Iraqi government tries to take back some of its territory lost in recent weeks to jihadi groups and Sunni militants. The fighting continued on Sunday as Iraqi helicopter gunships took out suspected insurgent positions for the second day in the northern city of Tikrit. However, the insurgent were able to repel the military effort and remain in control of the city with clashes continuing to take place in the northern neighborhood of Qadissiyah, according to two residents.So far, Washington has sent 180 of the 300 American troops President Obama promised to help Iraqi forces, in addition, to flying unmanned and manned aircraft over Iraq.

President Obama has become increasingly concerned that the battle hardened militants who have spent time in Iraq and Syria could pose a threat to U.S. security due to the fact they could enter the country without visas on European passports, the Associate Press reports Obama: Battle-Hardened Militants Pose Threat To U.S. In an interview last Sunday on ABC’s “This Week”, Obama said,”They’re gaining strength in some places. We’ve seen Europeans who are sympathetic to their cause traveling into Syria and now may travel into Iraq, getting battle-hardened. Then they come back.”  The POTUS believes that the U.S. must improve surveillance, reconnaissance and intelligence gathering to neutralize the risk, in addition, possible military strikes against these organizations that could do us harm. As of Monday, officials confirmed that the U.S. will be sending another 300 troops to Iraq to beef up security at the U.S. Embassy and elsewhere in Baghdad to protect U.S. citizens and property, the HuffPost and Associated Press report (Obama Orders More Troops To Iraq). This addition brings the count to 750 total U.S. troops present in Iraq. The State Department has announced it will temporarily move unspecified embassy staffers in Baghdad to U.S. consulates in the northern city of Ibril and the southern city of Basra. On Sunday and Monday, the Pentagon confirmed that 200 troops have arrived to reinforce security at the embassy, its support facilities and Baghdad International Airport as requested by the POTUS. In a written statement, the Pentagon’s press secretary, Navy Rear Adm. John Kirby, had this to say: “The presence of these additional forces will help enable the embassy to continue its critical diplomatic mission and work with Iraq on challenges they are facing as they confront Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.” Obama notified House and Senate leaders in a letter Monday of the additional forces. Obama has ruled out sending combat troops and insists the extra troops will stay in Iraq until security improves and reinforcement are no longer needed. Kirby said 100 additional troops who are on standby in the Middle East since the mid June will move to Baghdad to provide security and logistics support.