Please Help: He Served His Country in WWII Now He’s Served with An Eviction


To help out grandpa please click here.

The worst part is the eviction is coming from an unlikely place…his daughter and son in law. With so many people suffering around the world due to the financial crisis, so many people have come together to help their fellow man in this time of need without any incentive to do so. To all those everyday heroes, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. The man above of course is not my grandpa, but refers to himself on YouTube as grandpa who reminds me of my grandfather and other men who dutifully served their country in its greatest hour of need. It tugs at my heart strings to see the payback veterans of wars and let’s be honest the elderly in general get which is zilch. Sometimes people look at them as a forgotten relic of history inching every closer to deaths door (just look at nursing homes), however I see them as an insight into the past and the greatest story tellers. Some witnessed, participated and influenced the greatest moments in history and hold true to oral traditions the way they happen not the way we as Americans hear it. So a tribute to the man above is in order, I want to tell his story in hopes of everyday heroes coming to this humble mans rescue with help from an AOL article.

While scrolling through the myriad of articles on AOL, I happened upon this man’s story. Why did it touch me so? I have a grandfather like everyone else and like his granddaughter I have had to deal with feuding among family member over sorry to say some really stupid things. My goal as I am sure her goal is to ensure his quality of life remains the same and stays surrounded by the memories built in his home and not what works for everyone else. According to the article, a family feud between father and daughter could leave this 91 year old World War II veteran out on the street after his daughter gained ownership of his southern Ohio home and served him with eviction papers. His granddaughter, Jaclyn Fraley, is trying to keep him in his home he built as the deadline approaches on June 12.

The back story seems even more tragic. Fraley told AOL that when the elderly Potter fell ill he signed over his power of attorney then transferred his Zaleski, Ohio home to his daughter, Janice Cottrill (Fraley’s mother) in 2004. The man built his home 54 years ago according to WCMH-TV in Columbus. When Cottrill took custody of her autistic brother who was living in the home with the elderly Potter, a feud erupted between Cottrill and Potter over visitation rights ending in Cottrill serving Potter with eviction papers. His granddaughter sees how much it hurts her grandfather and has not spoken to her mother except through her lawyers over the past two years. When the two went to court to try and get the home back, the court sided with Cottrill in a May 2012 decision saying the statue of limitations had expired. The judge is expected to hand down an eviction time frame to Potter on June 12 according to AOL.

Both Janice Cottrill and her husband Dean declined to comment as their attorney, Lorene Johnston, told AOL that the two are “attempting to stir up public sentiment for themselves.” The craziest part of the story as most attorney would say is the case has been reduced to nothing more than a “a simple eviction process for someone who doesn’t own the home and doesn’t pay any rent.” Call me crazy but the man own the home and built it so I am confused. Dean Cottrill did say to WCMH that Potter had filed suit against him and Janice for visitation rights with his song and “For him to stay in that home, it is real simple. Leave Joe alone and stop the lawsuits.” Imagine a father that wants to see his son…hmmmmm…oh yeah this old man deserved everything he gets for being a good dad (I am being sarcastic if you could not tell).

Here is where the help comes in pay attention. Now the granddaughter (pictured left with grandpa) has decided to try and raise the money to keep her grandfather in his house. The goal is $125,000 so she can buy back the house from her mother, so far she has raised as of Wednesday evening $9,442 through donations and a lot of support. She’s set up a fundraising site on GoFundMe.com and says her grandfather is overwhelmed with the support he has received so far. “I hope he gets his house back, and lives out his best years in his house,” donor John Pirrone wrote on Fraley’s fundraising page. “Thank you for coming through for us in WWII, I hope that we can come through for you,” wrote donor Robert Sharpe. One veteran even donated $1,000 to her effort, she said. “The veterans community has been overwhelmingly supportive,” Fraley said. “To see this go almost viral, it’s what happens when one of your wildest dreams come true.” Thank you AOL for reporting on this as the news doesn’t report enough about the good people are doing on a daily basis. If you would like to help out this grandpa representing all of our elderly, please go to the site underneath the YouTube video and pledge your support.

Sequestration Nation: What March 1 Really Means for the Economy – DailyFinance

Sequestration Nation: What March 1 Really Means for the Economy – DailyFinance.

With many of the world’s nations falling into economic disrepair and fighting to stay afloat, the United States may come to the same fate come March 1. President Obama and congressional Republicans have no progress to head off the $85 billion in automatic budget cuts that go into effect on Mar 1. Lacking a bipartisan deal to avoid catastrophe and hoping to put pressure on the GOP lawmakers, the administration revealed details about the cuts’ consequences including less secure U.S. embassies, trimmed defense contracts, and furloughed air traffic controllers. When a budget fight between President Clinton and congressional Republicans led to two government shutdowns in 1995 and 1996, some threats came true and others did not only because private groups stepping in and contractors working for IOUs. The budget impasse eventually ended before serious damage happened.

This time no government shutdown will occur but automatic cuts between March 1 and September 30 will occur which means a reduction of 13 percent for defense and 9 percent for other programs according to the budget office. These cut and $1 trillion over the next decade were put into place two years ago when the administration and Congressional bargainers made them so harsh that everyone would be forced to compromise. This has not happened. According to the administration letters and testimony to Congress social security, Medicaid, Medicare, and veterans’ benefits are exempted. The cuts will be made over a seven month period and do not all take effect March 1. If a deal is reached anytime during this period the money could be restore either some or all. However left in effect the impact is not clear yet for each program. The law limits administration’s flexibility to protect initiatives, but the White House told agencies to avoid cutting those that present risk to life, safety or health and minimize harm to crucial services. Every agency will experience some effects from these budget cuts if they go into effect.

According to AOL Daily Finance these are the tentative cuts according to the administration letters and testimony to Congress:

-Defense: Troops at war would be protected, but there’d be fewer Air Force flying hours, less training for some Army units and cuts in naval forces. A $3 billion cut in the military’s Tricare health care system could diminish elective care for military families and retirees. And, in a warning to the private defense industry, the Pentagon said it would be “restructuring contracts to reduce their scope and cost.”

-Health: The National Institutes of Health would lose $1.6 billion, trimming cancer research and drying up funds for hundreds of other research projects. Health departments would give 424,000 fewer tests for the AIDS virus. More than 373,000 people may not receive mental health services.

-Food and agriculture: About 600,000 low-income pregnant women and new mothers would lose food aid and nutrition education. Meat inspectors could be furloughed up to 15 days, shutting meatpacking plants intermittently and costing up to $10 billion in production losses.

-Homeland Security: Fewer border agents and facilities for detained illegal immigrants. Reduced Coast Guard air and sea operations, furloughed Secret Service agents and weakened efforts against cyberthreats to computer networks. The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s disaster relief fund would lose more than $1 billion.

-Education: Seventy thousand Head Start pupils would be removed from the prekindergarten program. Layoffs of 10,000 teachers and thousands of other staffers because of cuts in federal dollars that state and local governments use for schools. Cuts for programs for disabled and other special-needs students.

-Transportation: Most of the Federal Aviation Administration’s 47,000 employees would face furloughs, including air traffic controllers, for an average of 11 days.

-Environment: Diminished Environmental Protection Agency monitoring of oil spills, air pollution and hazardous waste. The color-coded air quality forecasting system that keeps schoolchildren and others inside on bad-air days would be curtailed or eliminated. New models of cars and trucks could take longer to reach consumers because the EPA couldn’t quickly validate that they meet emissions standards.

-State Department: Slow security improvements at overseas facilities, cuts in economic aid in Afghanistan and malaria control in Africa.

-Internal Revenue Service: Furloughed workers would reduce the IRS’ ability to review returns, detect fraud and answer taxpayers’ questions. It offered no specifics.

-FBI: Furloughs and a hiring freeze would have the equivalent impact of cutting 2,285 employees, including 775 agents. Every FBI employee would be furloughed 14 workdays.

-Interior Department: Hours and service would be trimmed at all 398 national parks, and up to 128 wildlife refuges could be shuttered. Oil, gas and coal development on public lands and offshore waters would be diminished because the agency would be less able to issue permits, conduct environmental reviews and inspect facilities.

-Labor: More than 3.8 million people jobless for six months or longer could see their unemployment benefits reduced by as much as 9.4 percent. Thousands of veterans would lose job counseling. Fewer Occupational Safety and Health Administration inspectors could mean 1,200 fewer visits to work sites. One million fewer people would get help finding or preparing for new jobs.

-NASA: Nearly $900 million in cuts, including funds to help private companies build capsules to send astronauts to the International Space Station.

-Housing: The Department of Housing and Urban Development said about 125,000 poor households could lose benefits from the agency’s Housing Choice Voucher program and risk becoming homeless.