Ebola Crisis Faces New Problems, Gaza Talks Continue as Deadline Looms, While Iraqi and Ukrainian Forces Continue to Make Progress

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Scientists and health officials see an even bigger threat than the current Ebola outbreak: The fact that no one knows where the virus came from or how ti stop it from starting new outbreaks. Mike Stobbe and Marilyn Marchione report, Another Ebola problem: Finding its natural source, since 1976, two dozen outbreaks of the deadly virus has occurred in Africa with its possible origin beginning in bats, but experts don’t know exactly its origins in nature. The current outbreak has claimed 1,100 people in four countries making it the highest death toll in history of Ebola. Jonathon Towner, a scientist who helped to find the bat source of another Ebola like disease called Marburg, said: “First and foremost get the outbreak under control. Once that piece is resolved, then go back and find what the source is.” Towner works for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Richard Wenzel, a Virginia Commonwealth University scientist formerly a lead for the International Society for Infectious Diseases, says, “confirming the source would definitely be important.” Throughout history, halting a deadly infections not only involved limiting person to person contact but finding and controlling the source of the infection in nature. Stobbe and Marchione explain: “Plague was halted after the germ was tied to rat-riding fleas. With the respiratory disease SARS, civet cats played a role. With typhus it was lice, and with bird flu, live poultry markets. Efforts to control MERS, a virus causing sporadic outbreaks in the Middle East, include exploring the role of camels.” Health experts think the initial cases in each outbreak began with eating or handling infected animals such as certain bats that in parts of Africa are considered a delicacy. The World Health Organization lists chimpanzees, gorillas, monkeys, forest antelope and porcupines as possibly playing a role and pig farms where fruit bats may reside. Part of the puzzle is how long the virus has been in West Africa as previous outbreaks have been in the east and central regions of Africa. However, some scientist believe the virus had been in the are for years pointing to a case of a lone scientist who got sick in 1994 after doing an autopsy on a wild chimp in the Ivory Coast and to a recent study exploring the possibility that past Ebola cases in the region were undiagnosed. On Saturday, armed protestors raided an Ebola clinic in Liberia’s capital stealing blood stained bedding and forcing 20 infected patients to flee into the densely populated city, according to the article, Ebola isolation clinic looted in Liberia, patients flee. According to the United Nation’s Integrated Regional Information Networks, the West Point shantytown of 70,000 residents suffer from debilitating sanitary conditions with access to only four public toilets meaning defecation in the street is common. A senior Liberia police official told BBC: “This is one of the stupidest things I have ever seen in my life” and that the looting of blood-stained mattresses and bedding could spread the virus to all of West Point. Front Page Africa reports the assistant health minister on Thursday said there are plans to quarantine the area, but food and water must be brought into the township. The looting came the same day the Kenyan government banned travel to West African countries afflicted with the deadly Ebola virus. According to WHO, more than 400 people have died in Liberia from Ebola with more than 1,100 in total between Liberia, Guinea, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. Adam Schrek reports Monday, Nigerian woman suspected of Ebola dies in UAE, that a Nigerian woman who arrived in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, suspected of being infected with the Ebola virus, later died in the city, according to health officials. In a statement carried by the Emirati state news agency WAM Sunday, the health authority said the 35 year old woman was traveling to India from Nigeria fro treatment of advanced metastatic cancer. Her health deteriorated in transit at the Abu Dhabi International Airport as medics tried to resuscitate her and found signs of possible infection. The medical staff who treated the woman followed the measures outlined by the World Health Organization, however, the woman’s husband, who sat newt to her on the place, and the five medics who treated her were isolated pending test results on the deceased woman. All are in good health and show no signs of illness, health officials reported.

Meanwhile, as the clock winds down in the Gaza truce, the Palestinians remain divided Sunday on the latest Gaza ceasefire with Hamas opposed to a compromise Egyptian proposal to ease closure of the territory and other factions including delegates for President Mahmoud Abbas were inclined to accept, Mohammed Daraghmeh reports, Palestinian Divisions Emerge In Gaza Truce Talks. Hamas officials said they wanted more concessions in the Egypt mediated talks as the temporary truce expires late Monday. The outcome if a deal is not reached would be a return to fighting bringing more devastation to Gaza, an unofficial understanding falling short of a formal negotiated deal or another extension to negotiations. Nearly 2,000 Palestinians have been killed and more than 10,000 people wounded since July 8, according to United Nations figures. In Israel, 67 people have been killed with all but three soldiers. A Palestinian and Israeli negotiators returned to Cairo on Sunday following a weekend of consultations across the Middle East as the gap remained wide. The current five day ceasefire will end at midnight Monday. According to negotiators, the Egyptian proposal calls for compromise on both sides as it seeks to ease the blockade by allowing more imports and exports for Gaza and increase movement of people in and out of the territory’s Israeli controlled crossing. However, Hamas’ demands for Gaza’s air and seaports to be reopened are to be left until later. Gaza will not be forced to disarm rather Gaza’s border crossing will be controlled by forces loyal to Abbas and international reconstruction efforts in Gaza will also be controlled by Western backed Abbas to make sure money and materials don’t fall into the hands of Hamas. One member of the delegation said even if Hamas refuses the deal, Abbas’ forces are prepared to oversee the crossings and reconstruction. Other members said both Israel and Hamas appeared to agree on one thing which is neither wants to return to heavy fighting like in the past month. One official said, under conditions of anonymity: “The proposed agreement is not bad and can be amended a little bit. That prevents bloodshed and opens the way for rebuilding Gaza.” On Monday, Israeli troops destroyed the home of two Palestinians suspected of the abduction and killing of three teenagers in the occupied West Bank in June, the army said, according to Reuters, Israel destroys homes of Palestinians suspected of killing Israeli teens. Troops set charges to destroy the homes of Hussam Kawasme and Amar Abu Aysha in the southern West Bank before dawn and sealed off the home of a third suspect, Marwan Kawasme. Israeli accused Hamas militants, however, Hamas will not confirm or deny the accusations. Hussam Kawasme, a 40 year old resident Hebron, was arrested July 11 and the other two suspects remained at large. The killings sparked the current cycle of violence that led to a month long offensive between Israel and militants in Hamas dominated Gaza. The military statement said Israel’s supreme court affirmed the military’s wish to demolish the homes and rejected three appeals by the suspects’ families against their destruction.

In a turn of events, on Sunday, Ukraine’s government said separatists shot down a Ukrainian fighter plane after troops entered into the rebel controlled city in the east marking a possible turning point in the four month long conflict, Peter Leonard reports, Ukraine says troops entered rebel-held city. Ukraine’s national security council said government forces captured a district police station in Luhansk after intense clashes in the Velika Vergunka neighborhood. Weeks of fighting in Luhansk has left the city on the verge of humanitarian catastrophe as the siege mounted by government forces has prevented delivery of basic provisions and cut off power and running water. Ukrainian military spokesman Oleksiy Dmitrashkovsky on Sunday said the separatists shot down a Ukrainian fighter plane over the Luhansk region after launching an attack on rebels. Fortunately, the pilot ejected and was taken to a secure place. Meanwhile Sunday, part of the Russian convoy carrying food and supplies for Luhansk and other afflicted zones headed to the section of border closest to the city, but stopped short of the frontier crossing in early afternoon. The Red Cross, responsible for distributing the aid, on Saturday said the main holdup was the lack of security guarantees from both sides of the conflict. In a video posted online this weekend, the leader of the self-proclaimed rebel government in Donetsk region, Alexander Zakharchenko, said new military equipment was on its way from Russia including tanks and some 1,200 fighters who undergone training in Russia. Lysenko said the government had information that separatists have received reinforcements from Russia, but not all the equipment allegedly promised. Russia has denied the accusations of supporting the rebels with equipment and training, however, Ukraine’s President on Friday said that Ukraine had destroyed a large number of military vehicles crossing from Russia recently.

Meanwhile, back in the Middle East on Monday, following two days of U.S. airstrikes, Iraqi and Kurdish forces took back control of the country’s largest dam from Islamic militants, according to a military spokesman in Baghdad as fighting was underway for the rest of the strategic complex, Sinan Salaheddin reports, Iraq forces retake Mosul Dam; militants deny claim. Soon after the announcement, the Islamic State group, controlling the Mosul Dam for two weeks from the Tigris River just north of the city of Mosul, denied the claims insisting it was still in control. The retaking would be the first victory for the Iraqi and Kurdish forces battling the group since the airstrikes started earlier this month. The dam and its broader complex hold a strategic advantage as they supply electricity and water to a large part of the country. Army spokesman Lt. Gen. Qassim al-Moussawi said the dam itself was secured by Kurdish peshmerga troops and Iraqi security forces on Monday, but the southern side of the complex remains contested and fierce fighting is underway. Al-Moussawi said the Iraqi and Kurdish forces “hoisted the Iraqi flag over” the dam adding that the troops were backed by joint aerial support. Iraq’s Ministry of Defense said security forces “liberated a large part of the Mosul Dam” with the help of U.S. airstrikes, while U.S. Central Command would not confirm their involvement. In an internet statement, the Islamic State denied losing the dam and dismissing the government claim as propaganda. The U.S. military said U.S. forces conducted nine strikes Saturday and another 16 on Sunday. The decision to launch the airstrikes was the first direct U.S. military intervention in Iraq since the last American troops left in 2011 and reflect growing international concern about the extremist group. In a letter to Congress Sunday, the White House said that its air campaign in Iraq “is consistent with the president’s directive that the U.S. military protect U.S. personnel and facilities in Iraq, since the failure of the Mosul Dam could threaten the lives of large numbers of civilians and threaten U.S. personnel and facilities – including the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad.” It also stated that the failure of the dam could “prevent the Iraqi government from providing critical services” to the Iraqi people.

Ebola Become a Public Health Emergency, Gaza War Resumes, Obama Strikes Militants in Iraq and the Impact of the Ukrainian War

https://i0.wp.com/www.channelnewsasia.com/blob/1063890/1406814267000/a-map-of-africa-giving-data.jpghttps://i0.wp.com/mahmood.tv/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/gerog-of-chaos.jpghttps://i2.wp.com/images.dailykos.com/images/81051/large/Ukraine.jpgA U.S. official said Thursday that the current Ebola outbreak in West Africa on pace to sicken the most people than all previous outbreaks combined, Lauren Neergaard reports, CDC director: Scale of Ebola crisis unprecedented. Dr, Tom Frieden, Center for Disease Control and Prevention director, told a congressional hearing that the outbreak is unprecedented due to the face it occurred in a region that has never dealt with it before, while lax infection control and risky burial practices drive it. Friedman commented that tried and true public health measures could stop the disease spread but will be laborious as any case missed could keep it going. More than 1,700 people have been sick with the virus and 1,000 people have died, the World Health Organization reports. The U.S. Agency or International Development will spend $14.5 million to combat the outbreak and has sent a disaster team to the area to assist workers and provide tens of thousands of protective suits for them as well, said assistant administrator Dr. Ariel Pablos-Mendez. Frieden said the CDC will open more treatment centers and expand proper Ebola testing. Meanwhile, the World Health Organization, on Friday, declared the outbreak an international public emergency that requires an extraordinary response to stop the spread, the Associated Press reports, WHO declares Ebola outbreak a public health emergency. The largest and longest in history, the WHO announced the Ebola outbreak is troublesome enough to declare it an international public health emergency much like the flu pandemic in 2009 and polio in May. In the United States, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention already elevated its Ebola response to the highest level recommending against travel to West Africa.

On Thursday, the FDA approved a diagnostic test for the disease as President Obama told reporters at a U.S. Africa Leaders Summit that he wasn’t ready to share any experimental treatment with West Africa, according to the AOL article, Obama resists fast-tracking Ebola drug, but new test cleared. The drug Obama is referring to is ZMapp used to treat two Americans infected with Ebola before coming back to the States from West Africa. According to WebMD, it takes a long time to produce the drug because the ingredients take weeks to grow combined with a lack of FDA approval means it will be a while before mass production can happen. The diagnostic test is meant to detect the Zaire strain of Ebola which has infected 1,700 people and killed 932 in Sierra Leone, Guinea, Liberia and Nigeria. A statement from the FDA to health care workers says it authorizes the use of it because, “At this time, no FDA-approved/cleared tests that identify the existence of the Ebola Zaire virus … in clinical specimens are available.” According to thew AOL article: “The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services released a statement saying that the National Institutes of Health is working on developing one and it’s ‘aiming to launch phase 1 clinical trials … in the fall.'” In addition, the statement disclosed that Tekmira and Biocryst Pharmaceuticals funded by the Department of Defense will develop therapeutic treatments while a third, Newlink, is working on a vaccine. Rod Nickel reports, FDA Enables Potential Use Of Experimental Ebola Drug On Infected Patients, on Thursday the U.S. Food and Drug Administration modified its clinical hold status on Temirka’s experimental Ebola treatment to enable its potential use in humans infected with Ebola. Dr. Mark Murray, Temirka’s chief executive officer, said: “We are pleased that the FDA has considered the risk-reward of TKM-Ebola for infected patients. We have been closely watching the Ebola virus outbreak and its consequences, and we are willing to assist with any responsible use of TKM-Ebola.” The treatment is one of three worldwide that has shown promising results in monkeys, but unproven in humans. Tiny California biotech Mapp Biopharmaceutical gained international prominence this week as its drug was given to two U.S. aid workers who contracted Ebola in West Africa and shown signs of improvement.

On Friday, fighting resumed between Israel and militants in Gaza following a three day truce which expired and talks brokered by Egypt on a new border deal for the blockaded coastal territory stagnated, the Associate Press reported, Gaza truce expires, rocket fire resumes. Palestinian officials said one boy was killed at a mosque by one of Israeli’s 10 airstrikes, while two people were hurt in Israel, according to police, by one of many rocket and mortar attacks from Gaza. It is unclear whether talks will resume or escalation will occur, but Hamas officials are will to continue negotiations and Israel will as well with the provision that fighting halts in order to protect its people. The Israeli delegation left Friday morning making it unclear whether they would return. Within minutes of the truce expiring, Gaza militants fired rockets and by midday had fired 33. Israel wants to see Hamas disarmed or prevented from re-arming, while Hamas demands Gaza’s borders be opened leaving the all night talks before dawn on Friday without a resolution. The numbers so far: 1,00 Palestinians dead, 9,000 wounded, devastates areas along Gaza border with Israel, tens of thousands displaces, 67 Israelis, 5,000 Israeli strikes and thousands of Hamas rockets fired over the past month. Caught in the fighting, Gaza’s civilians struggle to get by with no electricity 21 hours a day due to power lines being hit, water taps run dry due to no power for their fuel pumps and tens of thousands displaced on floors of schools and hospitals, Karin Laub and Ibrahim Barzak report, Gaza Civilians Are Struggling To Get By As War Rages Around Them. The hardship is more apparent as Muslims on Monday started observing the joyous time of festive meals called Eid el-Fitr where traditional sweets are shared and family visits.

ON Thursday, in Iraq, residents said the Sunni militants from the Islamic State group stormed the Mosul Dam complex, Iraq’s largest dam, in one hour, Sinan Salaheddin and Sameer N. Yacoub reported, Islamic State Militants Seize Iraq’s Biggest Dam. The dam near Mosul lies on the Tigris River which runs through the capital, Baghdad. The Pentagon press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby says two U.S. F/A 18 jets drooped 500 pound bombs on a piece of artillery and the truck towing it outside Ibril near U.S. personnel. According to Julie Pace and Robert Burns’ article, US launched first airstrikes in Iraq, on Thursday President Barack Obama authorized the strike when Islamic state militants advanced on Ibril in northeastern Iraq where U.S. military trainers were stationed. In a televised late night statement from the White House, Obama said American military plans airdropped humanitarian aid to tens of thousands of Iraqi religious minorities surrounded by militants in need of food and water at the request of the Iraqi government. The food and water supplies were delivered to tens of thousands of Yazidis trapped on a mountain with no food or water after fleeing their homes under siege by Islamist state militants who issued an ultimatum to convert to Islam, pay a religious fine, flee their homes or face death. Obama said of a new war with Iraq: “As commander in chief, I will not allow the United States to be dragged into fighting another war in Iraq.” As for the rationale for the airstrikes regarding troops stations in Ibril and U.S. consulate in the Kurdish region of Iraq: “When the lives of American citizens are at risk, we will take action. That’s my responsibility as commander in chief.” The Pentagon said the airdrops were performed by one C17 and two C130 cargo aircraft delivering a total of 72 bundles of food and water escorted by two F/A 18 fighters from an undisclosed base in the region. In all, 5,300 gallons of water and 8,000 pre-packaged meals were dropped for 15 minutes at a low altitude. Administration officials said a unilateral U.S. strike would be consistent with international law because the Iraqi government has asked for Washington to take military action and Obama has constitutional authority to authorize the attack to protect American citizens. Critics, including some Republicans in Congress, have argued that Obama’s cautious approach in Syria allowed the Islamic State group to flourish and grow enough to move into Iraq making swift gains. In a statement, both Republican Sens. John McCain of Arizona and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina praised Obama’s proposed actions Thursday night but said much more will be necessary: “This should include the provision of military and other assistance to our Kurdish, Iraqi, and Syrian partners.” Officials said the White House was in contact throughout Thursday with lawmakers, including House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

Meanwhile, four months of fighting between the Ukrainian military and pro-Russian separatist rebels has taken a heavy toll on residents of the east as UN humanitarian operations director John Ging warned on Tuesday that the humanitarian situation has worsened, Charlotte Alfred reports, 5 Shocking Figures That Show The Devastating Impact Of East Ukraine’s War. At an emergency sessions of the UN Security Council Ging said civilians in Donetsk and Luhansk, controlled by rebels, had only access to water for a few hours a day adding that many homes were destroyed and medical supplies are runny low. While Uktain and Russia trade accusations of responsibility, Alfred reports that five shocking figures show how the crisis has changed the daily lives of thousands of Ukrainian civilians. The United Nations’ agency for refugees (UNHCR) says 117,000 people are displaced inside Ukraine and another 168,000 Ukrainians have applied to stay in Russia as refugees, temporary residents or new citizens. In total, Russia says 730,000 more Ukrainians came to Russian than usual since the beginning of the year, but UNHCR said the number is unreliable and Ukraine accuses Russia of inflating the numbers. According to the UN, a conservative estimate places the death toll at 1,129 people killed and 3,000 wounded in four month of fighting, while the Ukrainian government said 258 of the casualties were armed forces. Since April, 400 people were reported abducted in eastern Ukraine, according to the UN’s human rights monitoring mission in Ukraine. The mission reports said most of them are ordinary citizens, including teachers, journalists and students noting that some 211 are still being held, 185 were released and four found dead. The UN warned Tuesday the fighting has caused has destroyed the basic infrastructure in the east as water is scarce and many are displaced with no adequate shelter for winter. UNHCR sent food and supplies to civilians impacted by fighting including 15,000 people in Slovyansk which government forces captured in July. Humans Rights Watch reports that five hospitals in east Ukraine have been jot by rockets and artillery since June and responsibility for the attacks are unclear even though the group says circumstances suggest the Ukrainian army may be involved in some of them.