Climate Change Progress Yet to Happen

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Continuing with the Obama administration climate change action plan rolled out only one year ago, the White House will be hosting two roundtable discussion this week on the economic threat climate change poses and how to overcome those risks according to a White House Official. The discussion will focus on the costs of not addressing planet warming emissions, according to the email sent on the 23 of June,2014 and reported by Kate Sheppard of HuffPost. In the article, White House Plans Another Big Climate Push, explains that Treasury Secretary Jack Lew and White House leaders will meet with billionaire climate activist Tom Steyer and former Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson on Wednesday to assess the economic costs of climate change and release the report later this week entitled “Risky Business.”  Steyer, a former hedge fund manager turned environmental activist has decided to pledge $100 million to back candidate who support climate change action through his group, NextGen Climate Change. Lew, White House advisers John Podesta and Valerie Jarrett, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration head Kathryn Sullivan and Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Craig Fugate met on Tuesday with insurance industry representatives on climate impacts. Obama will address the issues at the League of Conversation Voters on Wednesday night, while Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Secretary of Interior Sally Jewell will speak earlier in the day at a League of Conservation Voters sponsored event. Wednesday marks the one year anniversary of Obama’s speech at Georgetown where he unveiled his climate action plan. The administration has made an effort to push new regulations on greenhouse gas emissions from power plants and announced initiatives to streamline government climate efforts and make climate data more widely available.

Unfortunately, on Monday June 23 of 2014, the Supreme Court placed limited on Obama plan to deal with power plant and factory emissions of gases blamed for global warming, the Associate Press reports. In the article, Supreme Court Justices Limit Existing EPA Global Warming Rules, the justices explain that the Environmental Protection Agency does not have the authority in some cases to force companies to reduce their carbon dioxide emissions in cases where the company needs a permit to expand facilities or build new ones increasing overall pollution. The decision does not affect EPA proposals for first time national standards for new and existing plants, the Associated Press reports. The most recent proposal aims at 30 percent reduction of greenhouse gases by 2030, but won’t take effect for another two years. The ruling does protect the EPA’s existing authority over facilities that emit pollutants that the agency regulates other than greenhouse gases. Since 2011, the EPA has issued 166 permits through state and federal regulators as of late March including permits for power plants, chemical plants, cement plants, iron and steel plants, fertilizer plants, ceramics plants and ethanol plants. In addition, oil refineries and landfills have also obtained greenhouse gas permits.

2 thoughts on “Climate Change Progress Yet to Happen

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    web page (Brenna)

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