Confederate Submarine’s Spar Holds Clues To Ship’s Sinking

 Confederate Submarine’s Spar Holds Clues To Ship’s Sinking.

In North Charleston, South Carolina, scientist may have pieced together the mystery behind the confederate sub H.L. Hunley that sank with its crew and never resurfaced. The historical significance is not only related to the Civil war but was the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship. Scientist believe that the Hunley was less than 20 feet ways from the Housatonic when the torpedo the crew ignited sank the Union blockade off South Caroline in 1864. The explosion was close enough to knock the crew unconscious long enough to cause them to drown before awakening. The discovery was based on an examination of the iron pole in front of the hand crank sub that held the torpedo. The sub was finally found in 1995, raised five years later and taken to North Charleston to be conserved. The copper metal sleeve found on the spar is an indication according to the conservator Mardikian that the torpedo was attached to the end of the spar which showed signs of deformities indicating an explosion. The crew was found seated in the sub when it was raised adding to the theory that the crew had been knocked out by a concussion of an explosion near by according to Lt. Gov. Glenn McConnell, a member of the South Carolina Hunley Commission. The final answer will come when the encrustation from the outer hull is removed. Scientist will arrange for a computer simulation and small models to be used to recreate the attack and more importantly tell what effects the explosion had on the sub.

2 thoughts on “Confederate Submarine’s Spar Holds Clues To Ship’s Sinking

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